Brain Cancer and Tumours in Children | Action Medical Research

Brain cancer and tumours

Every year in the UK, around 400 children are diagnosed with brain cancer. Many face prolonged and gruelling treatment with surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. While treatment can prove life-saving, it can also cause serious, long-term side effects.

Sadly, around one in every four children diagnosed with a brain tumour lose their lives within five years, making brain tumours the most deadly of all childhood cancers.

Iona pictured was just five years old when she was diagnosed with a brain tumour. She went through 10 hours of surgery which left her with some brain damage and without the ability to produce important hormones.

We are funding research to try and improve the chances and treatment for children like Iona with brain tumours and cancer.

Craniopharyngiomas: developing new drug treatments for children with these devastating tumours

Research date: 1 March 2015 - 28 February 2018
Grant amount: £190,617.00

Each year in the UK, around 30 children are diagnosed with a tumour called a craniopharyngioma.1 These tumours grow near the pituitary gland in the head, very close to the brain. Children normally undergo surgery, sometimes followed by radiotherapy. Both the tumour and its treatment can leave children with serious, long-term problems that badly affect...

Brain cancer: identifying the best treatment for each child

Research date: 13 January 2014 - 1 October 2018
Grant amount: £194,548.00

Every year in the UK, around 400 children are diagnosed with brain cancer.1.2 Many face prolonged and gruelling treatment with surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. While treatment can prove life-saving, it can also cause serious, long-term side effects, so it’s important to get the balance right. Professor Andrew Peet, of the University of...

Brain tumours: avoiding a serious side effect of surgery

Research date: 1 August 2012 - 31 August 2015
Grant amount: £98,120.00

Around one in four children who undergo surgery to remove a tumour from the back of the brain – the cerebellum – develop a distressing side effect called cerebellar mutism syndrome.1 They lose the ability to speak and have difficulty coordinating their movements. Although their condition normally improves with time, children are often left...

Other related information

Targeted treatments to help children with brain cancer

Posted: 31 March 2014 11:01 am
Iona was just five years old when she was diagnosed with a brain tumour. She went through 10 hours of surgery which left her with some brain damage and without the ability to produce important hormones. Iona’s cancer affected various areas of her brain including the optic nerve, pituitary gland, hypothalamus and the brain stem. The majority of...

New research could mean tailored treatment for children with brain tumours

Posted: 15 January 2014 14:00 pm
Children’s charity Action Medical Research and The Brain Tumour Charity today announce a new jointly funded project to develop a way to tailor treatment more closely to the needs of each individual child diagnosed with a brain tumour. Every year in the UK, around 400 children aged 0-14 are diagnosed with a brain tumour.1-2 Many face prolonged and...

Children’s brain cancer Doctor takes on Great North Run

Posted: 28 June 2013 12:26 pm
Dr Rebecca Hill, of the Northern Institute for Cancer Research, is running the 2013 BUPA Great North Run to help children’s charity Action Medical Research to save and change the lives of sick and disabled babies and children. This 2013 Great North Run will be Dr Hill’s sixth. A keen runner, she is looking forward to standing on the...

Top medical research investment over 60 years in North of England made possible by children's charity

Posted: 5 January 2012 11:12 am
Children’s charity Action Medical Research is celebrating investing more than £100 million into vital medical research over the past 60 years, which has led to some key scientific breakthroughs to help reduce the suffering of sick babies and children. Research funded over the years has included pioneering work carried out across the North of...

New research in Newcastle for child brain cancer victims

Posted: 22 August 2011 09:24 am
Children with medulloblastoma, (a type of malignant brain tumour), undergo extensive and debilitating treatment, which has led to marked improvements in survival rates over recent decades. Despite this, these tumours will return in a proportion of patients following treatment (termed relapse), and the vast majority of these will succumb to their disease....

Mum's little hero

Posted: 1 March 2011 12:22 pm
When five-year-old Jack Morley swoops into the room with his red wellies on announcing he wants to be a fireman, mum Lisa smiles with pride. Jack is already her little hero and she feels lucky to have him.In 2006, the Morley family faced a terrible shock. Lisa, husband Mark, daughter Imogen and 14-month-old...

Newcastle researcher dedicates his work to childhood cancer after suffering from leukaemia as a teenager

Posted: 6 December 2010 13:06 pm
 A specialist Newcastle-based doctor is undertaking a pioneering study into what causes life-threatening brain tumours in children under-three – after being awarded a Research Training Fellowship (RTF) from children’s health charity Action Medical Research.  Dr Chris Howell, who will be carrying out his research over three years...

Talented doctor commits to search for brain tumour treatment for children

Posted: 4 October 2010 10:17 am
Action Medical Research has awarded a prestigious grant to a doctor who wants to find better treatments for children with brain tumours. Dr Chris Howell has received a Research Training Fellowship for a three-year study to find what causes the malignant cancer in children under three – the most vulnerable age group. “This is a fantastic...
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