cancer | Action Medical Research

cancer

Childhood leukaemia: developing a new treatment to overcome drug resistance

Research date: 1 November 2018 - 28 February 2022
Grant amount: £208,120.00

Leukaemia is the most common cancer affecting children and young people, affecting around 500 families in the UK each year.1 Up to one in five of these children will have a fast-developing form of the disease called T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL).2 Thankfully, most are cured after treatment – but for those children where the disease...

Neuroblastoma: helping children who are at greatest risk from this potentially life-threatening cancer

Research date: 1 April 2016 - 31 March 2019
Grant amount: £196,219.00

Around 100 children are diagnosed with a type of cancer called neuroblastoma each year in the UK.1,2 Most are young – less than five years old.1,3 Many children with this cancer do well. Sadly, though, other children lose their lives despite going through gruelling treatment. Professor Deborah Tweddle, of Newcastle University, aims to help those...

Neuroblastoma: helping children’s immune systems to fight high-risk cancers

Research date: 1 October 2016 - 31 December 2019
Grant amount: £197,027.00

Around 100 children are diagnosed with a type of cancer called neuroblastoma each year in the UK.1,2 Most are young – less than five years old.1,3 While many children with this cancer do well, others lose their lives despite going through gruelling treatment that can have severe side effects. Professor John Anderson, of University College London...

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: making treatment even better

Research date: 11 April 2016 - 10 April 2019
Grant amount: £199,465.00

Around 300 children develop a type of cancer called acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) each year in the UK.1 This cancer is most common in young children who are less than five years old. Most children with ALL are cured. However, treatment has side effects and some children still lose their lives. Dr Owen Williams, of University College London’s...

HIV, immunodeficiencies and cancer: strengthening children’s immune defences

Research date: 7 September 2015 - 6 September 2017
Grant amount: £137,569.00

Some children have weakened immune systems, making them vulnerable to infection and putting their lives at risk. This includes children with HIV, and children with severe immunodeficiencies and some blood cancers who need a stem cell transplant to restore their immune system. Although treatment helps strengthen the immune system, some children remain...

Neuroblastoma: developing a new treatment for young children with cancer

Research date: 1 July 2014 - 30 June 2017
Grant amount: £179,874.00

Around 100 children are diagnosed with a cancer called neuroblastoma each year in the UK.1,2 Most are young – less than five years old.3,4 Although treatment often proves life-saving, it has side effects and doesn’t always work. Sadly, around a third of children lose their lives within five years of being diagnosed with neuroblastoma.4...

Germ cell cancers – protecting children from the side effects of treatment and saving more lives

Research date: 4 February 2015 - 31 May 2019
Grant amount: £197,895.00

Research Training Fellowship*: Dr Shivani Bailey Up to 45 children are diagnosed with germ cell cancer (GCC) every year in the UK.1 Some of these cancers occur in the ovaries or testes (germ cells develop into eggs and sperm); the rest occur elsewhere in the body, including the brain. Although survival rates are high, some children still die of their...

Other related information

Hope for young cancer patients

Posted: 19 April 2016 10:57 am
Each year around 100 children and babies are diagnosed with a type of cancer called neuroblastoma. While many make a good recovery, the chances of successful treatment vary considerably. For children with high-risk neuroblastoma the outlook can be bleak. They need intensive, prolonged treatment – usually including chemotherapy, surgery and...

How a new cancer treatment could save young lives

Posted: 21 April 2015 15:50 pm
Tragically, around a third of children diagnosed with neuroblastoma lose their lives within five years. A new combination treatment being developed aims to save more young lives from this devastating cancer. Neuroblastoma is the second most common solid tumour of childhood, after brain tumours. Most children affected are under five years old and, while...

New research could mean tailored treatment for children with brain tumours

Posted: 15 January 2014 14:00 pm
Children’s charity Action Medical Research and The Brain Tumour Charity today announce a new jointly funded project to develop a way to tailor treatment more closely to the needs of each individual child diagnosed with a brain tumour. Every year in the UK, around 400 children aged 0-14 are diagnosed with a brain tumour.1-2 Many face prolonged and...

Medical research charity marks Rare Diseases Day (Monday February 28)

Posted: 28 February 2011 09:43 am
Action Medical Research, the leading UK-wide medical research charity dedicated to helping babies and children, is marking Rare Diseases Day today (February 28) by celebrating pioneering research projects being carried out across the country.Families across the UK are coping with the reality of a child with a rare and devastating disease for which there is...
Help us spread the word