Craniosynostosis | Action Medical Research

Craniosynostosis

Craniosynostosis: improving treatment for children

Research date: 16 October 2017 - 15 October 2019
Grant amount: £160,610.00

About 350 children are born with craniosynostosis every year in the UK.1,2 In children with this condition, the bones in the skull fuse together too early, causing an abnormally shaped head and leaving no room for the brain to grow. Surgeons try to correct this by creating new gaps, but unfortunately these can join back together and children will often...

Craniosynostosis: improving diagnosis and care for children with this rare condition

Research date: 1 August 2016 - 31 March 2019
Grant amount: £173,162.00

About 350 children are born with craniosynostosis every year in the UK.1,2 In children with this condition, the bones in the skull fuse together too early, giving the head an abnormal shape and leaving no room for the brain to grow. Children can usually have operations to correct this, but they can be left with some long-term problems. Dr Steve Twigg at...

Other related information

Improving major head surgery for young children

Posted: 26 March 2018 12:07 pm
At just 10 months old Finley had his first major operation to rebuild his skull. With Action funding, specialists are testing a new treatment approach which could improve surgery in the future for children like him. Finley was born with Apert syndrome – a rare condition that causes a range of health problems including craniosynostosis which...

Craniosynostosis

Posted: 1 December 2003 01:00 am
We all take special care when holding a tiny baby. This is partly because we know that babies’ heads are particularly vulnerable, as they are still ‘soft’ and the skull is still forming. In fact, skull growth continues until late adolescence, and its proper functioning is crucial. But around 1 in every 2000 children is born with a...
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