Latest research | Children's Charity | Action Medical Research

Latest research

Research Projects

We are funding over 65 projects (including Research Training Fellowshipsat leading hospitals, universities and specialist centres across the UK. Currently funded projects include research into premature birth,  cerebral palsy, childhood infections, juvenile arthritis, leukaemia and some rare and distressing conditions.

Winter 2018

Spinal muscular atrophy: developing a potential new treatment £27,714 awarded for a three year project.  Led by Dr Bowerman, Keele University.

XIAP deficiency – developing gene therapy £141,793 awarded for an 18 month project. Led by Dr Booth, Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London.

Antibiotic use and resistance in critically ill children £192,758 awarded for a three year project.  Led by Dr Pathan, University of Cambridge.

Birth asphyxia – predicting long-term effects £180,783 awarded for a three year project.  Led by Dr Vollmer, University of Southampton.

Niemann-Pick disease type C: testing a potential new drug treatment £152,716 awarded for a two year project.  Led by Professor Platt, University of Oxford.

Cerebral palsy: can regular exercise through RaceRunning improve health and mobility? £72,422 awarded for a one year grant.  Led by Dr van der Linden and Dr Ryan, Queen Margaret University and Brunel University.

Pneumococcal meningitis – improving diagnosis and management £19,850 awarded for a 25 month project.  Led by Dr Oligbu, St George’s University of London.

Summer 2018

Bronchiolitis: developing ways to prevent or treat serious lung infections £180,527 awarded for a two year project.  Led by Dr Davidson, University of Edinburgh.

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: personalising drug treatment £196,088 awarded for a three year project.  Led by Professor Hall-Craggs, University College London.

Childhood leukaemia: developing a new treatment to overcome drug resistance £208,120 awarded for a three year project.  Led by Dr van Delft, Newcastle University.

Autism and ADHD: using state-of-the-art brain scanning techniques to spot problems early £199,968 awarded for a three year project.  Led by Dr Arichi, St Thomas' Hospital, King's College London.

Cerebral palsy - investigating surgery to help walking £199,889 awarded for a three year project.  Led by Mr Theologis, University of Oxford.

Premature birth: how does breastmilk help protect vulnerable babies from illness? £175,826 awarded for a two year project.  Led by Dr Smith, University of Northumbria.

Cerebral palsy: developing a new technology-based approach for hand and arm rehabilitation £68,563 awarded for a 18 month project.  Led by Dr Basu, University of Newcastle.

Cystic fibrosis: developing a new type of gene therapy £154,634 awarded for a two year project.  Led by Professor Hart, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London.

Research Training Fellowships 

Our Research Training Fellowship scheme is 45 years old and we have now funded 177 fellowships at a total value of over £13 million.

Our latest Research Training Fellows are carrying out research in the following areas:

Mitochondrial disease – investigating gene therapy  Dr N Keshavan of  the Genetics and Genomic Medicine Programme, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health was awarded £229,924 to investigate gene therapy for mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome.

What causes Crohn’s disease? Dr J Ashton of the Human Development and Health Department,  Southampton General Hospital and University of Southampton was awarded £240,640 to investigate functional and interpretive analysis of the microbiome and assessment of ileal transcriptome and genetic interactions in paediatric Crohn's disease.

Congenital heart disease - improving surgical treatment  Dr E Sauvage of the Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, University College London and Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London was awarded £155,516 to carry out a study entitled  PATCH – Patient-specific Treatment of Congenital Heart Disease.

None of our work would be possible without the generosity of people who make donations, raise funds and take part in events, as well as our trust and corporate partners.

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